Select Rowland Miscellany



Here are some Rowland stories and accounts over the years:

Rowland and Rowlands in the 1891 Census


Numbers (000's)
Rowland
Rowlands
Total
North Wales
   0.3     
   2.0     
   2.3       
South Wales
   0.9
   2.2
   3.1   
Cheshire
   0.5
   0.4
   0.9
Lancashire
   1.0
   0.7
   1.7
London
   1.2
   0.2
   1.4
Elsewhere in England
   5.6
   1.7
   7.3
Total
   9.5
   7.2
  16.7



Daniel Rowland, Methodist Preacher

Daniel Rowland was one of the foremost leaders of the Calvinistic Methodist revival in Wales in the 18th century.  He had followed his father as a curate in the parishes of Nantcwnlle and Llangeitho in Cardiganshire.  

Sometime around 1735 he experienced a profound spiritual conviction and began to thunder against the people's sins.  He began to travel up and down the country.  In 1737 he met Howel Harris and these two joined forces to push forward the great Methodist revival in Wales.   He split up with Harris in 1752 and he now became the leader of ‘Rowland's people,’ as his followers became known. 

In 1760 his brother drowned at Aberystwyth and he was given his living of Llangeitho.  But the Anglican church authorities deprived of this curacy in 1763.  From that time on he chose to stay with his people in his “New Church” in Llangeitho. 

Daniel
Rowland was, above all, a preacher and for a long time he made Llangeitho the Mecca of Welsh Methodists.  Thousands would flock there on Communion Sunday and he exercised a profound influence on the spiritual life of his generation.



Bowen Rowlands versus David Davies in Cardigan

David Davies was the 'self-made man' par excellence and the epitome of the emerging class of new Welsh industrialists, mainly self-made pioneers like himself.  He sank coal mines in the Rhondda, was enthusiastic in developing new railways and building Barry docks.  He was a patron of many local causes and, above all else, he was a Calvinistic Methodist.

William Bowen Rowlands, by contrast, took a degree in Classics at Oxford and was ordained as a priest in 1865.  A High Anglican, he leaned very much towards Rome and in fact later in life converted to Catholicism.  His life changed in 1870 when an Act of Parliament allowed for the first time clergy of the Church of England to resign their orders.  He did so and took an interest in Liberal politics.

These two figures were to contest the 1886 Parliamentary election for Cardiganshire.  At first it would appear that Davies held all the cards.  He represented the Calvinistic Methodist streak that was strong within the county.  He had befriended the local squirearchy.  However, he voted against his party leader Gladstone on the issue of Irish Home Rule and some in the party never quite forgave him.  Rowlands defeated him in the polls by a slender majority of nine.

Rowlands held onto the seat until 1895.

 

Rowland and Rowlands Today


Numbers (000's)
Rowland
Rowlands
Total
UK
   15      
   15
   30     
America
   12
    1
   13
Elsewhere
    5
    3
    8
Total
   32
   19
   51


T. Rowland and Sons, Shovel Makers

Benjamin Rowland, born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania in 1777, received little education and consequently entered upon a career of mechanical industry.  He laid the foundation of the family business by acquiring the Cheltenham town grist mill in 1795.  He retired in 1810 and the grist mill was put up for sale.  It changed hands a few times before his nephew, Benjamin Rowland Jr, bought it in 1846.  

Benjamin Jr. was already in business, having obtained land from his uncle on the south side of the creek that gave him the rights to obtain additional water power for his own factory.  He also acquired land from his uncle on the Tookany river where he erected a tilting (tilt hammer) and blade mill.  This was to become the Upper Mill of the Rowland factories and the most productive, because it had the highest dam and therefore the most power.  

T. Rowland and Sons was the second largest shovel manufacturer in the United States in the 19th century. Before the advent of large earth-moving machines, shovels played their part in America’s national development.  T. Rowland and Sons produced “1,200 dozen spades and shovels” and, by 1884, employed 95 people.  The business was sold in 1901.


George Rowland at the Victorian Goldfields

George Rowland was once the victim of a would-be assassin who tried to shoot and rob him, whilst he was resting in his tent on the goldfields.

Fortunately George was lying on his stretcher, with his right arm across his chest, and the bullet intended for his heart was deflected and penetrated two fingers on his right hand.  On that occasion when George returned from the goldfields to Adelaide, he traveled with his arm in a sling.  When the bullet wound healed, two of the fingers on his right hand were “fused together."




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